Campus-wide Family Feud fetish

Campus-wide Family Feud fetish

Leigh Jacobson

Spotlight Editor

One would expect that at this point of the year, Milken students would be focused on their respective responsibilities: freshmen, finishing up their first year of high school; sophomores, anticipating the end of the year and finals; juniors, gearing up for SATs and AP tests, and seniors….well, being second semester seniors.

Not so.

Instead, many Milkenites find their time consumed by none other than the infamous Family Feud Facebook app. Reminiscent of the Farmville obsession in its glory days, and accompanied by hauntingly catchy theme music, Family Feud pits Facebook users against each other in a quest to fill in various categories correctly.

Developed by iWin Inc. and Backstage Inc., the game has seen a recent spike in popularity among Facebook users…especially Milken students.

“When I’m not playing Dungeons and Dragons, I play Family Feud,” Jason Welsh ’13 said. “It’s so addicting.”

“I play Family Feud at night when I’m alone,” Elai Shine ’12 said.

The intensity and passion demonstrated by Feud-playing students has even started to alarm their peers: “I’m worried. I’m really worried. The Milken community is at the hands of a corny daytime game show,” Ami Fields-Meyer ’12 said. “This is worse than Farmville.”

Family Feud Facebook app
The infamous Facebook app consumes the lives of Milken students.

Another reason for concern is Robot Unicorn Attack, a highly stimulating game that involves—you guessed it—a robot unicorn attacking/ jumping to certain objects for points.

“My life revolves around Robot Unicorn Attack,” Shaina Sarafian ’12 said.

Luckily, however, the latest of virtual gaming trends has not yet pervaded all of the student body.

“I have better things to do with my time,” Robert Ravanshenas ’11 said. “Like collect state quarters.”

So is this trend here to stay? Or will it be swept into cyber oblivion, like its predecessors Happy Aquarium and Café World? Only time will tell. For now, Milken students can only hope for the (virtual) buzzer to indicate that this game’s time is up.